All posts filed under: Reviews

Margaret Atwood, The Handmaid’s Tale

Thoughts on The Handmaiden’s Tale *This post hase very little editing, is constructed to reinforce my new knowledge, and therefore not that valuable to the public. I publish it to start a habit of reflection that I hope becomes valuable to more than just me. The book is unsettling, seems unresolved and therefore more of a blip, a small casm into the memory of the protagonist, a moment in “history” that we had forgotten. The whole setup, it’s slow build, the shifts between present and past slowly make up a landscape that seems feasible. I think that’s what I hear predominantly from readers. This scenario could occur. With the amounting political shifts around the world, the direction into nationalism posted by the Trump Administration and Brexit, and the forking and firewalls occuring across the internet, their is a feeling of unpredictability. Maybe with the advent of unicorn billion dollar startups like Uber, the notion of black swan events is being revealed. The ability for corporate giants to built into movements that circumvent local jurisdiction. The …

Nassim Taleb, Black Swan

Thoughts on The Black Swan *This post has very little editing, is constructed to reinforce my new knowledge, and therefore not that valuable to the public. I publish it to start a habit of reflection that I hope becomes valuable to more than just me. Taleb describes the complexity of randomness as it is – unknowable. Randomness isn’t statistical randomness, as he puts it ‘Ludic Randomness’ or some platonic probability. Statistical randomness only occurs within manufactured contexts like casinos or politics. These contexts would fit within mediocristan – I think this refers to the mediocre impacts of randomness – they are in some ways predictable somewhat like a fractal pattern. The unknown unknowns is true randomness – it is not just the map or our interpretation of reality – it is the territory. It is the black swan. The analogy of the black swan is we knew for century of only white swans. I.e. the “Truth” was Swans = White. Until black swans were discovered in Australia, and the truth was dramatically changed. This demonstrates …

The Grid, Gretchen Bakke

Thoughts on The Grid *This post has very little editing, is constructed to reinforce my new knowledge, and therefore not that valuable to the public. I publish it to start a habit of reflection that I hope becomes valuable to more than just me. The Grid is an inquiry into the electrical system Energy is ephemeral. It’s synonymous with data. It is also instant. This collision of concepts creates an illusion of stability and constant in the minds of users. It was difficult for me to conceive of the energy powering the light above me was being generated at that very instant. Energy, electricity is not like water. It travels to the least resistant path which could be thousands of kilometers but still arrive almost instantaneously. Power is made to specifications of how much is estimated to be used. This can cause shortfalls when technology usage like AC is underestimated due to poor weather forecasting. Appropriate to comment on the Finkel Review, which proposed solutions for Australia’s energy. Most alarming, or most notable is the …

The Adventurers: a board game review

The Adventurers: The Temple of Chac is designed to prevent you from winning – that doesn’t sound like a fun board game. In order to win, five detailed player miniatures must travel between two slow moving walls, across 10 unstable glyph tiles arranged over a lava pit, over an unstable bridge or over a waterfall, and reach the exit before a large plastic boulder blocks the corridor, ending the game even if your alive. It’s a hard game, even for experienced board game reviewer, Tom Vasel, “I have still not survived [a game].” But comments like this are said with enthusiasm for the game. The reward of playing The Adventurers isn’t from collecting treasure around the board tiles, it’s from beating the mechanisms designed to kill you. “I have still not survived [a game].” I’ve survived once, and admittedly winning felt better. I learnt quickly what I shouldn’t do, to survive; like don’t jump on the bridge (it will break) or don’t stay in the wall room too long (it will eventually crush you). This is the first issue of The Adventurers: the …