DIGC202
Comments 4

A Transition from the Old Aesthetic

Ted begins with the quote “Thought, nothing but thought.” This is an Old Aesthetic metaphor  describing a network as a brain sending thoughts. Romantic metaphors like thought  and memory guided our understanding of network capabilities. I agree with Sterling (on Wired) that this language oppressed the shift in perception like “metal chains”. Sterling suggests that “modern creatives … will have to disengage from the older generation’s mythos”.  Instead, creatives should use the New Aesthetic design.  James Bridle says the New Aesthetic “points towards new ways of seeing the world”. It engages the internet with the physical world. Like “an echo of the society, technology, politics and people that co-produce them.”

THE FEATURED IMAGE IS A COLLECTION OF NAIVE THOUGHTS I WROTE DOWN WHILE READING THE READINGS.

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4 Comments

  1. Such a new and creative way to present your thoughts, to be honest, reading the colloquial sentences allowed me to understand the concepts in an easier way. I enjoyed how short and sweet your post was, and covered all grounds which is something im working on, so good job!!

  2. I love your image as a collection of your thoughts, very creative!
    I must admit though, I did have to read your blog a couple of times to fully understand it. I think my understanding would have been better had you perhaps explained the writers concepts a bit more in depth but I do understand the word constraint.

    • Yeah, the writing is pretty fucked in this post. Trying to deal with big concepts in 100 words only confuses people. Thanks for the feedback. :)

  3. A very creative way to present your thoughts and I can say that similar notions ran though my mind as well.

    I love the way Bruce Sterling writes, and that particular article articulate the ideas of this new aesthetic well and quoting it as “an eruption of the digital into the physical.” couldn’t be more on point, even with the article being written 3 years ago, this idea is still prevalent in digital artefacts we see and use everyday.

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